What weighs 200 pounds, reaches speeds of up to 45 mph and can cost your customers thousands of dollars in a split-second?

AIGdeerDeer collisions cost U.S. drivers millions every year, with an average repair cost of more than $4,000 for each claim. Odds for a deer collision double from October through December, so talk to your customers about the difference between comprehensive and collision coverages and share the tips below to help them avoid a deer accident:

  • Be more alert at dawn and dusk, when deer are most active
  • If you feel the need to swerve, use caution and be aware of oncoming traffic and your surroundings
  • Slow down – headlights only shine 200 to 250 feet in front of a vehicle, and a standard-sized vehicle typically takes 240 feet to come to a complete stop from 60 mph.
  • When you see a deer cross the road, slow down and expect more to follow
  • Watch for “deer crossing” signs and slow down when they are present
  • Use high beams while driving at night if there is no other traffic around

Welcome to the Halloween Safety Guide

AIG Halloween2Anytime a child has an accident, it’s tragic. Having your child get hurt any day of the year would be horrible but the last thing that you want to happen is for your child to be hurt on a holiday, like Halloween. It would forever live in the minds of the child and family, ruining that special time of year.

Everyone wants to have a safe and happy Halloween for themselves, their guests and especially their children. Using safety tips and some common sense can help you make the most of your Halloween season, keeping it as enjoyable for your kids as it is for you! There are lots of simple ways to help keep your child safe on Halloween, when accidents and injuries are more likely to occur.

The excitement of children and adults at this time of year can sometimes make them not as careful as they would normally be. Our site is filled with suggestions that can do a lot to stop tragedies from happening and help make the most of everyone’s favorite holiday of the year… Halloween!

By keeping Halloween a fun, safe and happy holiday for you and your kids, you’ll look forward to many happy years of Halloween fun! By keeping good memories for your kids, they’ll be more likely to carry on the traditions that you have taught to them with their own families some day!AIG Halloween3

Halloween Safety Tips for Drivers

AIG HalloweenHalloween is a wonderful holiday, but because of increased foot traffic and that Trick-or-Treaters are out at night, the potential for automobile related accidents with young pedestrians increases four times on this night according to a CDC (Center for Disease Control) study.

Streets are literally crawling with all sorts of witches, ghosts, goblins, vampires and all other sorts of costumed people. This makes for added responsibility for drivers to make sure that they drive safer than normal.

In many areas, people drive their kids into subdivisions and let them out to walk from house to house. Usually the parent follows behind in the car. This can cause traffic jams in small areas and much confusion as kids dart between cars on the streets going from house to house. A driver is already distracted because they are trying to keep an eye on their own kids and usually aren’t paying attention to much else.

Children and adults tend to be preoccupied and may not pay as much attention to safety as they should. They may not see your vehicle or just assume that you see them automatically. Stay on the defensive and you shouldn’t have a problem while driving on Halloween night.

Don’t use a cell phone or other electronic device while driving on Halloween night. You shouldn’t be doing this anyway, the rate of cell phone related auto accidents has jumped dramatically since the use of cell phones and texting has risen so high. Some states have already made laws concerning this and others are working on it.
Pay extra attention, particularly to crosswalks, intersections and the side of the road. Kids tend to walk along the curbs, cutting across the street to get to other homes. Keep scanning all around you as you drive, whether as thru traffic or along with your kids as they trick-or-treat.
Drive below the posted speed limit in residential areas during trick-or-treating hours. This will allow you time to break if you see a child dart in front of you.
Do not pass other vehicles that have stopped in the roadway, they could be dropping off children. This is more common in rural areas but can happen anywhere.
Instruct your child to never get into the car of a stranger. It might be easy for your child to mistake someone else’s car your car with the excitement of Halloween. Put a lighted plastic Jack-O-Lantern on your dashboard to make your car more recognizable to your child,
It’s also a night that child predators are looking for victims. Let your child know that they should never get into the car of a stranger at any time. If someone stops them and asks for help or offers them candy, tell them to scream as loud as they can and run.
Make sure your child carries a flashlight, glow stick or has reflective tape on their costume to make them more visible to cars. Left them know if they carry a flash light to never shine itin the eyes of a driver. This can cause blindness on the drivers part temporarily and they may not see your child.
If you are dropping off or picking up your kids in an area, pull off the road into a safe spot and turn on your hazard lights to alert other motorists. If you go with your kids from door to door, leave the hazard lights on so other drivers can see your car parked there.

 

A few years ago no more than a mile down the road from our office a driver was not paying attention and drove on the sidewalk and killed one child and injured many others on Halloween night. So sad.